7 Days of gut-healing meals (and why they’re good for you)

Lately I’ve redoubled my efforts to include as many healing, happy-gut foods in my diet. Here are some of my current favourite meals and snacks for health and healing.


Chopped banana, strawberries and frozen blueberries drizzled with honey

It’s sad that fruit has a bad reputation (mainly due to its high fructose content), because it can really be so healthy. Bananas are easy to digest and they give you energy and heart-supporting potassium. I’ve also always found them extremely soothing to eat, especially when my tummy’s unhappy. Strawberries give me a good dose of vitamin C and blueberries are known to help ease the symptoms of digestive diseases.


Eggs, baby spinach and music

A lot of healing diets forbid or discourage the consumption of eggs, but I’ve never personally had a problem with them. They’re full of protein as well as important vitamins and minerals. Spinach meanwhile is virtually a ‘superfood’ and I’ve really been trying to get it into my diet as often as possible. I actually feel like I’m slowly healing my body with each mouthful! Spinach is full of vitamins, and it’s even got Omega-3 fatty acids and anti-inflammatory antioxidants. It’s good for digestion and flushing out toxins, and I recently learnt that cooking spinach actually increases its health benefits because the body can’t completely break down its nutrients when it’s raw. Music is good for the mind, body and soul, so include as much of it in your diet as you can.


Brussels sprouts

I adore Brussels sprouts (I know, it’s unusual!) and I can easily – and often do – eat bowls of them as snacks. Like most other veggies, they offer high doses of vitamins and nutrients, as well as their fair share of fibre. This means they can cause bloating and should be avoided if you’re flaring. Don’t cook your Brussels sprouts for too long or you’ll destroy the healthy bits! Three to five minutes is enough.



ALL THE VEGETABLES!!! (and a little steak)

So this is what my dinner plate looks like most nights. I take the 3/4 veggie rule so seriously that I usually end up with four quarters of vegetables on my plate and no space for the meat – hence the mashed butternut on the side! Starting with the butternut, it’s filling and easy to digest – it’s one of the first vegetables you can introduce on SCD, and I’ve always loved it and found it to be unproblematic. Carrots are the first veggie introduced on SCD, as they’re also generally very easy to break down. They’re also full of vitamins and minerals.

Broccoli and cauliflower are cruciferous vegetables (as are Brussels sprouts, bok choy, cabbage and kale), which means they’re packed with phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals and fibre, and overall they’re just amazingly fabulous for your health. They also help support the functioning of the digestive tract (read this fascinating article about the healthy interaction between cruciferous vegetables and the bacteria in your gut). Most of us know that peas are a great source of protein and fibre – but did you know that they also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties?

Avocado is one of the healthiest fats you can add to your diet and its Omega-3 helps to reduce inflammation in the gut. My nutritionalist has recommended I eat it every day – that’s how healing it is! Lastly, lean red meat is obviously a protein source, and despite what detractors might say, it’s also one of the best sources of nutrients that you won’t get from plant-based foods.


Coconut fish curry with cauliflower rice

I’m not the biggest fish fan but I am trying to get it into my diet more often because it’s just so damn healthy. This is hake, which offers Omega-3 acids and a range of nutrients. I’ve cooked it in homemade coconut milk, which is another incredibly healthy fat that my nutritionalist recommends I consume daily, due to the fact that it’s so healing for the gut. As you can see, I’ve tossed in some handfuls of baby spinach for an extra health kick, and it’s seasoned with all the usual ‘legal’ seasonings like garlic and ginger – both of which are also considered ‘super foods’ due to their healing and health-sustaining properties.


Coconut yoghurt with honey

This is made from coconut milk, and has the added benefit of gelatine and probiotics, which are added just prior to incubating it. Probiotics introduce healthy bacteria to your gut and gelatine is an amazing weapon in the fight against inflammation.  This is one of the healthiest things you can feed a damaged gut. Here’s my recipe for homemade coconut yogurt.


Oysters and champagne

Okay so this was a bit of a splurge (I was celebrating signing my permanent contract at work), and champagne – or any alcohol for that matter – should be avoided when you’re flaring, or when you’re trying to heal your gut. I was thrilled to discover some time ago that oysters, however, are so so good for you! They’re full of zinc, which is essential for those of us battling digestive diseases as we tend to lose a lot of it. Zinc is essential for healthy functioning and also helps to heal woulds. You’ll find it in pumpkin seeds too.


Bonus: Cauliflower pizza

Everyone needs to feel like they’re eating something fun every now and then – even those of us with IBD! This cauliflower pizza was made from many of the healthy ingredients listed above, so it has the added benefit of hitting that ‘junk food’ spot without actually being junk food! The olives and mushrooms are also sources of healthy fats and nutrients, and it’s all drizzled with coconut oil for that extra bit of healing.

What are you favourite healing, healthy meals?


The best paleo cauliflower soup – dairy/grain/refined sugar free and vegan

Paleo cauliflower soup

Paleo cauliflower soup – dairy, grain and refined sugar free

My sister made this amazing soup for me last week, and I instantly fell in love with it. Why is it so special? It’s filling, easy to make, and it doesn’t feel like it’s ‘missing’ anything despite having no dairy or gluten. It’s also a great way to get more broth into your diet (if you’re not vegan/vegetarian). Oh and it’s delicious!

I recreated it tonight with a couple of tweaks, though I still think hers was better – kind of like how coffee always tastes nicer when someone else makes it for you 🙂

Thanks C for this amazing recipe!

Easy cauliflower soup – dairy, gluten and refined sugar free; vegan

Serves 4 to 6


  • 1 – 2 tsp coconut oil
  • 2 medium onions
  • 3 – 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 large head of cauliflower
  • 1 large sweet potato (for SCD, omit or use butternut)
  • 1 cup vegetable stock*/chicken stock/bone broth
  • A handful of fresh coriander
  • Garlic salt (optional)
  • Salt and black pepper


“I let the ingredients fry while I chop the next thing. I think it makes a difference to the flavour to let it fry a while,” advises my sister.

– Chop the onion and add to a large pot with the coconut oil. Fry on medium-high heat.

– Chop the garlic and break the cauliflower into florets and add to the pot. If the pot becomes too dry, add more coconut oil or a splash of water.

– Add the cubed sweet potato and chopped coriander to the pot and season everything well with salt and black pepper, and garlic salt if desired.

– Pour in the stock/broth, then fill the pot with water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 hour.

– Remove from heat, blend with a stick blender and serve.

It’s that simple! I say it serves four to six, but if I’m eating it, it probably serves two to three 😛

*Most shop-bought stocks aren’t suitable for those of us following healing diets. Make your own vegetable stock by simply reserving the cooking water when you boil veggies on the stove.

Day 93: Meat vs veg – my lightbulb moment

These days, you tell people that you eat meat and you may as well have said that you skin kittens in your spare time. In a world of vegan hipsters, meat is murder and using animal products is about the worst thing you can do after using plastic or not having a beard. Don’t get me wrong: I grew up in a house that was 50% vegetarian – neither my mom nor sister eat meat – and I have the utmost respect for the fact that they don’t eat meat – as they do for the fact that my dad and I do.


Anyway, the point is that SCD had shown me that my body tolerates protein far better than it does simple carbs/veg, and while I could live on veg quite happily… Well I realise that I actually can’t.

If you’ve followed this blog for a while, you’ll have seen me post photos of my food. Most of my meals consist of a little protein and A LOT of veg. Some meals often don’t contain any protein. And now, having tested my food and my reactions for three months, I know one thing for sure: veg is knocking me for a six, and I need to completely change how I’m eating. It’s a huge mental shift because for so many years, I’ve built my meals around vegetables, and eaten much less meat. It’s not that I don’t like it… it’s just that I preferred veg. But I realise that, if I want to avoid excessive bloating, loose stools, cramps and gas, can’t keep loading up on veg and adding a dash of protein as an afterthought.

I’m not going to radically change anything while I’m still on SCD. I’m going to finish off this last week properly, and then as I mentioned last week, I’m going to transition to paleo, and to a more high-protein, low carb way of eating. It irritates me that this is a ‘fad’ now (have you heard of banting?) – just as it annoys me that it’s a fad to be ‘gluten intolerant’, making all our foods so much more expensive! But at least it might make my belly happier, which is the ultimate goal.


Parties, booze and little steps forward

The past four days have been interesting in terms of diet. I’ve eaten lots of meat and much less veg, and I feel far less bloated. I’ve also been eating almonds (blanched and slivered this time) and that seems to be a little more tolerable. That said, I know I need to take it easy with them.

Last night, after a long day of celebrating birthdays and family visits (read: drinking), I dove into a packet of vegetable chips at home. They didn’t contain any illegal additives BUT they did contain veg that I shouldn’t have eaten, like sweet potato, so again, I’ve proven to myself (not that I didn’t know this already – doh!) that after hours of champers, I need to be kept away from temptation. That said, I didn’t eat ANYTHING bad or illegal at any of the dinners or parties we went to, which made me so proud of myself. Like several times before, while on this diet, I showed myself that i can have a great time despite not stuffing my face. It’s really been a revelation for me.

NOT yesterday's selfie

NOT yesterday’s selfie

I’m entering my last week of my personal SCD challenge and I’m so excited that I’ve finally had my lightbulb moment (I can’t believe it took me this long). It’s going to be quite a challenge to switch up my diet so radically (for me), but I think after SCD, I can handle anything 🙂

Day 81: My foodie inspiration & today’s new food

Today, I started thinking about my mom, one of the healthiest people I know, and incidentally, someone who’s overcome ‘chronic’ disease. ‘Chronic’ is in inverted commas for a reason – you’ll see why. My mom is my foodie (and lifestyle) inspiration! Here’s why:

About eight years ago, she was diagnosed with Graves Disease, an autoimmune disease that mainly affects the thyroid. She lost a ton of weight and had a lot of other nasty symptoms that led to her diagnosis.

The specialist she consulted immediately recommended that she have her thyroid destroyed, which in itself can have very serious health implications. She declined this course of treatment and stuck to her meds. Fast forward eight or so years, and there hasn’t been a hint of her Graves Disease in years. Regular tests reveal, over and over again, absolutely no further indication of the illness in her body.

Why it spontaneously manifested, and why it subsequently beat its retreat, is not known. What I do know is that my mom lives one of the healthiest lifestyles of anyone I know. My whole life, until about three years ago, she was the same steady weight of 50kg (she’s very short so this weight is perfect for her). It’s increased a little over the past few years due to regular ageing (she’s 63 53 49), but she’s still a small little person with an excellent figure for her age.

Mom, my sister (on the right) and me

Mom, my sister (on the right) and me

She’s been a vegetarian for more than 35 years and eats every fruit and vegetable under the sun. When I was growing up, she cooked three to four different kinds of vegetables every night, and EVERY night we had a fresh salad with supper (and she worked a full day!). She snacks on things like nuts and never drinks alcohol, fizzy drinks or juice.

Instead, she loves her tea, which she consumes by the bucket-load every day (with the tiniest drop of milk and half a teaspoon of sugar), and her milky cappucinos. You’ll never see her eating takeaways or junk food, bingeing on cake or eating dessert after supper, as she simply doesn’t have a taste for these things. She’s never been given to over-indulgence, except when it comes to chocolate, which she seems able to consume in unlimited amounts, and of course that never-ending stream of tea and cappucino with the odd bran muffin thrown in.

At 63 53 49, she’s incredibly good for her age. She can’t sit still, so she walks her hyperactive Jack Russell several times a day, often for an hour at a time (a habit she’s had for decades – not the same dog of course) and she’s constantly on the go. She also practices yoga twice a week, which she’s done for years, and works as a voluteer teacher at a school for underprivileged kids.

This is what my mom and her Jack Russell are working towards!

This is what my mom and her Jack Russell are working towards!

Although she doesn’t sleep well and has the occasional ache or pain, overall her health is excellent. She’s fit, hardly ever gets sick, and her body is in good shape. If you ask me, I think so much of it has to do with the food she eats, her level of activity and, of course, genetics (yay for me!). So this is why I’d say my mom is my foodie inspiration. When it comes to living clean, my mom’s got it waxed.

Who’s your foodie inspiration?

Springing a leek

Thankfully, not that kind of leak. Tonight I introduced leeks, which is not a vegetable I’d eat very often, but it adds such a great flavour to your food. Also, the supermarket had such a limited variety of veg available this evening, and the Brussels Sprouts that I’d been planning on buying were super overpriced.
Who knew there was good bacteria in leeks!

Who knew there was good bacteria in leeks!

The leeks were fresh and organic, and they just looked amazing. I added them to some venison ‘bolognaise’ and thoroughly enjoyed them. Best of all? I can sneak them into meals without K realising – like soups, stews, sauces, etc. She thinks she doesn’t like them but I plan to sneak them into our food tomorrow night (oh, that’s another thing: I’m cooking an SCD meal for her tomorrow) and I’m 99% sure she won’t notice 🙂

There are still loads of fruits I can add now on Phase 3 but I’m still not in love with the idea of cooking my fruit so I’m giving it a skip until I can eat them raw.

How’s your diet going? How far are you and what new foods have you introduced?