Yogurt that hearts you

SCD/paleo/AIP coconut yogurt

SCD/paleo/AIP coconut yogurt – honey heart optional šŸ˜‰

Tonight when K offered me a snack, I asked her to bring me a bowl of my coconut yogurt with a drizzle of honey. I heard her dishing it up, and I heard her opening the cupboard where the honey is… and then I heard a lot of concentrating. Yes, I know K well enough to know the sound of her concentrating – even (and especially) when she’s being silent about it!

“You’re making a heart!” I shoutedĀ from the lounge.

“What?! How did you know?”

Well, as I always like to remind K, I know everything šŸ™‚ And I definitely know the sound of her turning my food into heart shapes.

And in case you were interested – yes, the yoghurt was especially deliciousĀ because it takes about half a bottle of honey to make a heart šŸ˜‰

Here’s the recipe for my homemade coconut yogurt – SCD, paleo and AIP friendly. Honey-heart optional!

Day 83: Dairy-free SCD yogurt recipe – a SUCCESS!

I’ve been promising this recipe for weeks, and I’m sorry it’s taken me this long. This yogurt is smooth, tasty and BEST of all, it has the PROPER yogurt consistency thanks to the addition of gelatine (which in itself has loads of health benefits). What a success – finally it doesn’t feel like I’m eating chewed-up nuts when I have my SCD yogurt šŸ™‚

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This recipe isĀ based on a few different onesĀ that I’ve tweaked/combined, but I mainly used the recipe from Thetastyalternative.com. I’ve included the links at the end.

As always with homemade yogurt, you need to plan ahead: It takes about 30 hours from step 1.

Dairy-free cashew-coconut yogurt – SCD & paleo friendly

Makes 1 litre

1/2 cup cashew nuts

1 cup shredded/desiccated coconut

15ml vanilla extract

15ml-30ml honey

6g gelatine (make sure you have room temperature water on hand too)

Yogurt starter cultures (ensure that they’reĀ lactose free if need be)

Method

Step 1: Soak your cashews in water for around 8 hours. I put them in a sealed container and keep them in the fridge, then rinse them when done.

Step 2. Make cashew milk. Cashews are the most awesome nuts to make milk from because they break down completely – no need to strain the milk. Put your cashews into a blender with 2 cups of water (filtered if you like). Pulse a few times to break up the nuts, then let it run on high speed for a few minutes. Check to make sure the nuts are completely broken down (if not, blend a little more), and then leave to stand for 10 or 15 minutes. Remove the thin layer of foam that forms on top.

Cashew milk - very smooth and creamy

Cashew milk – very smooth and creamy

Step 3. Make coconut milk. Add your coconut together with 2 cups of hot (not boiling) water to your blender. Blend for about 3-5 minutes, until it’s nice and creamy looking. Pour the milk into a strainer lined with cheesecloth or a nut milk bag, and strain it. Then, gather up the bag/cheesecloth and squeeze until you’ve extracted all the milk. Of course, you can use the pulp for cereals, bakes, etc, or dry it out and turn itĀ into coconut flour.

Step 4. Heat your milks. Add 2 cups of coconut milk and 2 cups of cashew milk to a pot (you may have a little leftover), together with the vanilla extract and honey. Heat on a very gentle simmer until you reach 85C (185F). Always remember to stir the mixture well before taking a temperature reading. I use a clay pot for this step. Keep a close eye on the milk and don’t let it overheat, boil or burn.

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Step 5. Cool your milk. Take your mixture off the heat and allow it to cool to 43-49C (110-120F). While you’re waiting (I usually place it in a sink full of cold water and ice packs), mix 6g of gelatine with 75ml room temperature water and let it sponge.

Step 6. Add your gelatine. When the milk has cooled to the right temperature, add your gelatine. Ensure that it is well incorporated by using a stick blender to give it a good proper mix. I always clean my stick blender with boiling water before hand to make sure it hasn’t got any other bits of food/flavour still stuck to it.

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Step 7. Cool again. Place the potĀ back into the cold water and let it cool to around 38C (100F). Give it a good stir.

Step 8: Add your yogurt starter.Ā At 38C/100F, add your starter to the mixture. You couldĀ also use 5 capsules of probiotics instead. Give the mixture another good spin with the stickĀ blender.

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Step 9. IncubateĀ . Pour your mixture into a sterilised container, and place it into your yogurt maker. It will need 12 hours here, soĀ overnight usually works best.

Step 10. Refrigerate. After 12 hours, removeĀ the container from your yogurt maker and give the mixture a good stir to re-incorporate any gelatine that’s separated. Let it stand for about an hour, then put it in the fridge for at least 8 hours.

Your yogurt is ready! I always add honey to mine because I find it quite tart, but it’s not necessary. It’s a delicious, excellently textured yogurt that is a real pleasureĀ to eat. Enjoy!

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Look at that texture!

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Absolutely delicious, especially with a little extra added honey

Check out these great blogs:

– Thetastyalternative for this amazing yogurt recipeĀ which I have shamelessly hijacked.

– WellnessMama for the instructions on making coconut milk.

– Cookies and Kate for the tips on making cashew nut milk.

Day 78: A jar and a spoon…

…is all that’s left of the almond butter I opened… on Friday. This is why I shouldn’t buy things like this! I have absolutely no self control.

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I love nut butters. LOVE.Ā On SCD, particularly the early phases, there’s not much ‘naughty food’ to binge on. Not that nut butter is particularly naughty, but of course it is very high in calories and I suspect nut buttersĀ make me bloated.

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And of course, peanuts are illegal on SCD plus they’re not *real* nuts… they’re legumes (neh-neh-ne-nehhhh-neh)

Nuts and an SCD belly

Nuts definitely don’t agree with everyone, and in fact they’re known to cause problems for people with damaged guts. Nuts are very hard to digest, and they can be bloating. They can also cause diarrhoea and/or constipation.

It’s recommended that you don’t introduce nuts (even nut milks and nut butters) until you’ve been symptom free for 3 months (for me, it’s going on 4 or 5 months).

I tested almonds quite some time ago when I first made SCD yogurt on phase 2. The first time I made the yogurt, I used unstrained almond milk which meant it had lots of ground-up almonds in it, and thatĀ didn’t agree with me (lots of bloating).

I used strained almond milk next, and I tolerated that a lot better (SCD yogurt recipe here). Since then, over the weeks, I’ve introduced coconut milk, cashew butter and macadamia butter. They don’t wreak havoc on my system and I tolerate them well in small amounts, but I doubt I’m doing my body any favours by clocking a jar in 72 hours!

How well do you tolerate nuts? Any tips or advice? And HOW can I stop eating it like a crazy person?!?

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SCD yogurt recipe (step by step)

My first batch of SCD yoghurt was delicious, but it didn’t really agree with me, which is sad. You can read more about it hereĀ and here. I’ll try it again in the future when my gut has had more time to heal. If you are able to handle nuts, you should definitely give it a try. The flavour was wonderful.

This week, I attempted to make the yoghurt again, this time using almond nut milk instead of whole (ground) almonds. The yoghurt has turned out wonderfully, though I’d make it a bit thicker next time. Here’s how I did it, step by step.

Ingredients

2 cups blanched almonds

Honey

Vanilla extract

Gelatine

Yogurt starters cultures (lactose free if you’re lactose intolerant)

Tools

Blender

Sieve

Cheesecloth, nut milk bag or clean, unused stocking

Medium-large pots

Thermometer

Sterilised jars and spoons

Yogurt maker

Preparing your almonds

About 3 days before you’d like to have your yogurt (remember, this is SCD, so everything takes a little longer!), take 2 cups of blanched almonds and soak them, uncovered, for up to 2 days. You can soak them overnight to shorten the process, but the longer you leave them, the creamier the milk will be.

Working with unblanched almonds:Ā If you, like me, have unblanched almonds, simply plop them into a bowl of boiling water for a few minutes, and then you’ll easily be able to squeeze them out of their skins. K helped me with this, and we turned it into a bit of a competition!

Preparing your almond nut milk

Once you’ve finished soaking your nuts, give them a good rinse, and then add them to your blender with 2 cups of water per cup of nuts – so four cups of water in total. I did mine in two batches. First, pulse the blender a few times to break up the nuts, and then blend at full speed for 2 minutes. The nuts should be nicely broken down at this stage.

Next, you need to strain your milk. Take a sieve and line it with cheesecloth or, in my case, a nut milk bag. Place it over a clean bowl, and pour the nut milk into it.

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Then, gather up the bag or fabric, being careful not to spill, and squeeze out as much of the milk as you can (using clean hands!). You should get about 2 cups of milk for every 1 cup of nuts.

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Storing your almond milkĀ 

I didn’t have time to make my yogurt right away, so I refrigerated the almond milk in clean jars. There’s debate about how long it can last in the fridge – some say 2 days; others say 2 weeks. Your nose will certainly tell you if it has gone off. I added some to my coffee this morning, after 5 days in the fridge, and it seems fine.

Voila - homemade almond milk!

Making your almond milk yogurt

Now the fun part! Heat your almond milk, together with 1 tbsp honey and 1tsp vanilla extract, gently on the stove in a large pot or Dutch oven (I used the latter). Ā I used 1 litre of milk. Actually, when I say ‘I’, I mean K, because she did this part for me while I was stuck working late!

Keep the heat low and stir constantly to avoid scalding the milk. When it reaches 185F (85C), remove it from the heat. Be sure to stir it before you take temperature readings. Now, let it cool down. I sped up this process by putting the pot in a sink of iced water. Keep an eye on it if you do it this way – it can cool more quickly than you’re expecting.

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In the mean time, mix 4 tsps of gelatin with 1/2 cup room temperature water. I used 3 getaline leaves (1 leaf = 1 tsp), but I definitely think more was required. You might need to play around here.

When the yogurt reachesĀ 110-120F (43-49C), add your gelatine and mix it in using a stick blender. Then, when the yogurt reaches 100F (37/38C), add your yogurt starter, and again use your stick blender to fully incorporate it in the mixture.

How much yogurt starter?Ā The guys at SCDLifestyle.com suggest using 1/8 of a tsp for every 2 quarts, which is what I use. So you’ll need 1/16 of a tsp for 1 litre, if my maths (and conversions!) are correct.

Now, transfer your mixture to your sterilised yogurt maker container (or whatever containers you’re using) and place into your yogurt maker for 12 hours only. Do not touch, shake, move or disturb the yogurt maker at all during this time, as the culturing process is extremely sensitive to movement.

After 12 hours, carefully remove the yogurt from the yogurt maker and allow it to sit for 1 hour. At this point, some people stir the yogurt while others believe that it’s still very sensitive to movement. I don’t touch it. Lastly, place it in the fridge for at least 8 to 10 hours, which allows the gelatine to thicken.

Enjoying your yogurt

My batch is a bit thin, but definitely closer to the consistency and taste of real yoghurt, so I’m really thrilled. I eat mine with some extra honey, as the taste is quite tangy and requires a little sweetening. The honey isn’t necessary though, but you do need to add it to the yogurt to give the cultures something to feed on.

The yogurt will last in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. If you’re just starting out, add it in TINY amounts every day to allow your body to get accustomed to it. The cultures are powerful and you need to be careful. I overdid it on my first go-round, which was a very silly thing to do. It was just so tasty!

My yogurt with a lovely drizzle of pure honey