The best paleo cauliflower soup – dairy/grain/refined sugar free and vegan

Paleo cauliflower soup

Paleo cauliflower soup – dairy, grain and refined sugar free

My sister made this amazing soup for me last week, and I instantly fell in love with it. Why is it so special? It’s filling, easy to make, and it doesn’t feel like it’s ‘missing’ anything despite having no dairy or gluten. It’s also a great way to get more broth into your diet (if you’re not vegan/vegetarian). Oh and it’s delicious!

I recreated it tonight with a couple of tweaks, though I still think hers was better – kind of like how coffee always tastes nicer when someone else makes it for you 🙂

Thanks C for this amazing recipe!

Easy cauliflower soup – dairy, gluten and refined sugar free; vegan

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients

  • 1 – 2 tsp coconut oil
  • 2 medium onions
  • 3 – 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 large head of cauliflower
  • 1 large sweet potato (for SCD, omit or use butternut)
  • 1 cup vegetable stock*/chicken stock/bone broth
  • A handful of fresh coriander
  • Garlic salt (optional)
  • Salt and black pepper

Method

“I let the ingredients fry while I chop the next thing. I think it makes a difference to the flavour to let it fry a while,” advises my sister.

– Chop the onion and add to a large pot with the coconut oil. Fry on medium-high heat.

– Chop the garlic and break the cauliflower into florets and add to the pot. If the pot becomes too dry, add more coconut oil or a splash of water.

– Add the cubed sweet potato and chopped coriander to the pot and season everything well with salt and black pepper, and garlic salt if desired.

– Pour in the stock/broth, then fill the pot with water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 hour.

– Remove from heat, blend with a stick blender and serve.

It’s that simple! I say it serves four to six, but if I’m eating it, it probably serves two to three 😛

*Most shop-bought stocks aren’t suitable for those of us following healing diets. Make your own vegetable stock by simply reserving the cooking water when you boil veggies on the stove.

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Day 86: My 100th post and FORTHWITH with Phase 4! (plus a new SCD/paleo recipe)

This morning while deciding what to cook for dinner tonight, I suddenly realised:

WHERE IS PHASE 4?!?!

I frantically scrolled back through this blog to figure out when I started Phase 3… and it was 39 days ago – eek! If you follow this blog, you’ll know that I have no problem eating the same food over and over (and over and over) again, which is probably why I got stuck on Phase 3 without even really realising that I was stuck.

In the early phases, I was eager to test food and move through the phases because the choices were so limited. But once I hit phase 2, and even more so phase 3, I got comfortable and complacent in my little ‘safe food’ bubble. I got into a habit of cooking butternut, green beans, tomato and gem squash every Sunday, and I was quite happy with my little routine.

Until I suddenly realised that I could be eating so much more! And, after 39 days on phase 3, I SHOULD be.

Phase 4, forthwith!

So I immediately made the decision to start phase 4, and tonight I began with pineapple.

Even though you can eat raw fruit and veg on Phase 4, I decided to cook my pineapple in a sweet and sour-type dish for tonight, to which I also added chicken, ginger, veg and tomato. It’s packed with (well-cooked) veg (I’m still hesitant to take chances with raw/undercooked veg) and it’s oh-so-healthy:

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Here’s the recipe:

‘Sweet and sour’ chicken, pineapple and ginger pot

Ingredients

  • 1 medium onion, grated
  • 1 medium carrot, grated
  • 2-3 baby zucchini, grated
  • 1 small knob ginger, grated
  • 2-3 leeks, thinly sliced
  • 1-2 tsp minced garlic (depending on taste)
  • A few glugs pure tomato puree
  • 2 skinless boneless chicken breasts, sliced thinly
  • 8-10 baby tomatoes, halved
  • A generous handful broccoli florets
  • 1/2 to 1 cup of pineapple, chopped into small blocks (soft parts only)
  • Handful of fresh coriander, chopped

Method

Place the grated onion, carrot, zucchini, ginger, leek and garlic in a pot, add a splash of water and cook on high heat for about 10 minutes, stirring frequently.

Pour in the tomato puree and mix well, then add the chicken and cook until white – 2 to 3 minutes. Finally, add the rest of the ingredients, turn down to a simmer and cover. Allow to cook for about 15 minutes, checking from time to time to make sure it hasn’t dried out (it shouldn’t).

I served mine with gem squash and fresh avo slices. Delicious!

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And my belly?

My tongue is singing, but my belly is growling. It’s bloated, tight and gurgly. Cue sad face. I loved this dish!

Vegetables makes me bloated, full stop. I don’t eat them before I go out, for example, and I know when I have a veggie-based meal, I’m going to blow up like the Michelin Man.

Yes, the whole point of SCD is to be able to accurately identify the foods that make you bloated, but it’s not as easy at it seems. Even though I introduced foods 3 days apart and monitored my symptoms, it was still tricky to pinpoint exactly where the bloat was coming from.

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To be honest, I got lost somewhere along the way. I’m not entirely sure how it happened, because I tried to be so careful in my testing. But I do know that sometimes I get more bloated than other times – which leads me to believe that while food plays a big role in my symptoms, it’s not the only contributing factor.

[NB: I’ve just had a brainwave: SALT?? I eat loads of it. Doesn’t salt contribute to bloating? Perhaps I need to seriously consider reducing my intake].

What I do know is that my bloating was quite under control until Phase 3, so I think it was the introduction of the more ‘advanced’ veg that put me back a few steps. I know if I cut every vegetable back out, except for the squashy veg, the bloating would pretty much disappear. But do I want to do that? Of course not. So this is a choice I make – squash only and no bloating, or a variety of veg and bloat.

Tonight's selfie (okay *yes*, you got me - I'm sucking in)

Tonight’s selfie (okay *yes*, you got me – I’m sucking in)

SIGH.

Why can’t I just live on nut butter?

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A week’s supply

PS: After my 90 days + 10 extra on SCD, I plan to transition into paleo, which is supposed to really aid in bloating. Now that SCD had healed my GI system, I’m hoping that paleo will be able to target the bloating.

Day 83: Dairy-free SCD yogurt recipe – a SUCCESS!

I’ve been promising this recipe for weeks, and I’m sorry it’s taken me this long. This yogurt is smooth, tasty and BEST of all, it has the PROPER yogurt consistency thanks to the addition of gelatine (which in itself has loads of health benefits). What a success – finally it doesn’t feel like I’m eating chewed-up nuts when I have my SCD yogurt 🙂

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This recipe is based on a few different ones that I’ve tweaked/combined, but I mainly used the recipe from Thetastyalternative.com. I’ve included the links at the end.

As always with homemade yogurt, you need to plan ahead: It takes about 30 hours from step 1.

Dairy-free cashew-coconut yogurt – SCD & paleo friendly

Makes 1 litre

1/2 cup cashew nuts

1 cup shredded/desiccated coconut

15ml vanilla extract

15ml-30ml honey

6g gelatine (make sure you have room temperature water on hand too)

Yogurt starter cultures (ensure that they’re lactose free if need be)

Method

Step 1: Soak your cashews in water for around 8 hours. I put them in a sealed container and keep them in the fridge, then rinse them when done.

Step 2. Make cashew milk. Cashews are the most awesome nuts to make milk from because they break down completely – no need to strain the milk. Put your cashews into a blender with 2 cups of water (filtered if you like). Pulse a few times to break up the nuts, then let it run on high speed for a few minutes. Check to make sure the nuts are completely broken down (if not, blend a little more), and then leave to stand for 10 or 15 minutes. Remove the thin layer of foam that forms on top.

Cashew milk - very smooth and creamy

Cashew milk – very smooth and creamy

Step 3. Make coconut milk. Add your coconut together with 2 cups of hot (not boiling) water to your blender. Blend for about 3-5 minutes, until it’s nice and creamy looking. Pour the milk into a strainer lined with cheesecloth or a nut milk bag, and strain it. Then, gather up the bag/cheesecloth and squeeze until you’ve extracted all the milk. Of course, you can use the pulp for cereals, bakes, etc, or dry it out and turn it into coconut flour.

Step 4. Heat your milks. Add 2 cups of coconut milk and 2 cups of cashew milk to a pot (you may have a little leftover), together with the vanilla extract and honey. Heat on a very gentle simmer until you reach 85C (185F). Always remember to stir the mixture well before taking a temperature reading. I use a clay pot for this step. Keep a close eye on the milk and don’t let it overheat, boil or burn.

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Step 5. Cool your milk. Take your mixture off the heat and allow it to cool to 43-49C (110-120F). While you’re waiting (I usually place it in a sink full of cold water and ice packs), mix 6g of gelatine with 75ml room temperature water and let it sponge.

Step 6. Add your gelatine. When the milk has cooled to the right temperature, add your gelatine. Ensure that it is well incorporated by using a stick blender to give it a good proper mix. I always clean my stick blender with boiling water before hand to make sure it hasn’t got any other bits of food/flavour still stuck to it.

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Step 7. Cool again. Place the pot back into the cold water and let it cool to around 38C (100F). Give it a good stir.

Step 8: Add your yogurt starter. At 38C/100F, add your starter to the mixture. You could also use 5 capsules of probiotics instead. Give the mixture another good spin with the stick blender.

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Step 9. Incubate . Pour your mixture into a sterilised container, and place it into your yogurt maker. It will need 12 hours here, so overnight usually works best.

Step 10. Refrigerate. After 12 hours, remove the container from your yogurt maker and give the mixture a good stir to re-incorporate any gelatine that’s separated. Let it stand for about an hour, then put it in the fridge for at least 8 hours.

Your yogurt is ready! I always add honey to mine because I find it quite tart, but it’s not necessary. It’s a delicious, excellently textured yogurt that is a real pleasure to eat. Enjoy!

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Look at that texture!

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Absolutely delicious, especially with a little extra added honey

Check out these great blogs:

– Thetastyalternative for this amazing yogurt recipe which I have shamelessly hijacked.

– WellnessMama for the instructions on making coconut milk.

– Cookies and Kate for the tips on making cashew nut milk.