Pros and cons of a low carb high fat (LCHF) diet

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Tons of people are following a low carb, high fat (LCHF) lifestyle at the moment and raving about it – and I can see why. Having followed the diet myself for several weeks, I can tell you that I’m really happy on it – but, like every eating plan, it’s not for everyone. In my completely non-expert opinion, and in the spirit of experimentation, here are my top pros and cons.

 Pros

  • Quick initial weight loss. Within one week of starting the diet, I dropped 2kgs, with what felt like very little effort.
  • Never/seldom hungry. I’ve never lost weight this effectively without feeling ravenous all the time. I hardly ever feel hungry and I certainly don’t feel like I’m on diet.
  • You don’t eat ‘diet foods’. If you love meat, nuts, seeds, eggs and dairy, LCHF is perfect for you. No rice cakes or diet shakes or grapefruit.
  • It helps manage my IBD symptoms. It took a few weeks for my BMs to regulate, but from the start I had almost no digestive discomfort, and very little bloating. My belly seems to love LCHF.
  • No sugar cravings. Possibly one of the biggest benefits for me, a self-confessed sugar addict, is the fact that including more fat in my diet seems to have combatted my sugar cravings, and even reduced my taste for the stuff.
  • Feeling better. When I eat sugary and gluten-based foods, I often wake up the next day feeling groggy, ‘stuffy’ and just generally under the weather. Sometimes, if I really overindulge in these foods, I get terrible cramps and my body even feels sore to the touch. I always feel good and healthy when eating LCHF.
  • Easier food prep. Steak and salad is quicker and simpler to prepare than, say, a curry. Grabbing a handful of almonds is an easier snack than whipping up a smoothie. But this depends on what you like to cook and eat.

Cons

  • Expense. LCHF foods aren’t necessarily ‘cheap’ foods, especially now that this style of eating is so trendy. The price of meat, nuts and cheese all adds up – to a lot. You may find it balances out if you were previously buying lots of packaged or processed food, but then again, it might not.
  • Less butternut and banana. I had to cut out two of my staples, which made me sad. But pumpkin is fine, and once I combatted my sugar cravings (which only took a day or two), I didn’t miss bananas at all.
  • Limited choices. Particularly when it comes to snacking, it can be hard to find LCHF foods that aren’t pricy (nuts), unrealistic to eat on their own (a piece of meat or a block of cheese) or simply difficult to get on the run (have you ever tried to find a ready-to-eat, ripe avo at your local corner shop? Yup, exactly).
  • Very rich foods. High-fat foods can be very rich, and about three weeks into the diet, I became quite nauseated – a feeling that lasted a number of days. I’m not sure if it was too much fat or protein, or just being completely and utterly sick of eating eggs, but it wasn’t pleasant. Nothing really helped – I just had to wait for it to subside (which it did).
  • Lactose intolerance. If you’re lactose intolerant, like me, your options are even more limited. I have been including a bit of cheese in my diet as a test, and it seems mostly fine.
  • Snacking is HARD. I know I’ve covered this already, but it bears repeating. Every snack is supposed to include some fat and protein – this means that you shouldn’t really be snacking on fruit or yoghurt, especially if you’re trying to avoid fruit. I graze on biltong, nuts, grain-free toast and cheese, but again, these are not cheap snacks and they’re not easy to grab on the run.
  • Weight loss can plateau quickly. If you’re following the diet for weight-loss purposes, you might find your weight loss comes to an abrupt halt. This could be due to eating too much fat and protein – after all, it’s not a free-for-all. Nuts, butter, cream, etc are calorie bombs and even if they’re allowed on the diet, they’ll hinder your weight-loss efforts if you overindulge. Remember that it’s HIGH fat, MEDIUM protein and LOW carb.

So as you can see, there are benefits and drawbacks to LCHF eating – as there are to any other kind of diet. The only way to find out whether or not it’ll work for you is to try it. And if you have, please share your thoughts and experiences – I’d love to hear your feedback 🙂

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