Anatomy of a sugar craving

One of the best and easiest-to-understand explanations I’ve seen.

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LCHF diets and sugar cravings: Exactly why you shouldn’t cheat

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I decided to try a low carb, high fat diet last year after a particularly bad sugar binge, and the results blew me away.

But let’s go back a minute, to the binge. It started with a single small slice of red velvet cake at work one November morning last year. By the end of the day, I’d devoured something like five slices of cake, a packet of chocolate biscuits, whatever random old chocolate I could find at home (I don’t really keep chocolate in the house) and most of a jar of hot chocolate powder. Yes, hot chocolate powder. Straight out the jar. My nemesis.

In fact, I decided to write this blog post now as a distraction from that self-same powder currently winking at me from our kitchen at work – a large jar that someone has lovingly donated to the office. I can’t stop thinking about ladling several heaped spoons directly into my mouth, which would probably be frowned upon by my colleagues and also extremely embarrassing because I usually inhale half the powder and end up choking.

But that’s besides the point. Or, not really.

Because as I lay on the couch that night in November regretting every morsel I’d binged on – and it really was a binge – I realised that things needed to change. I’d read a lot about LCHF diets and since it was one of the few I’d never tried, having always been terrified of the idea of eating FAT, I decided I had nothing to lose.

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Within one week of strict LCHF eating, I’d not only lost 2kgs, but I’d also almost lost my sugar cravings. It was INCREDIBLE. I think I’ll always struggle to resist sugar, but I wasn’t having hourly – okay okay, ‘minutely’ – thoughts of chocolate and cake and chocolate cake. I felt so good, and I was eating right: meat, vegetables, eggs, salad, coconut and olive oils, avocado, almonds. I was satiated all the time and didn’t feel any need to snack or cheat.

Then about a month later, my birthday rolled around, and I decided to treat myself – and for me, treating myself ALWAYS means food, never shoes or handbags or teacup pigs. For  several days, I gorged myself on chocolate, cake, wine, bubbly and all the carbs that were within arm’s reach.

I tried to get back on the wagon, and it felt like I had one foot on and one foot off. Through December, January and early February, I kept trying to claw my way back onto the eating plan but kept slipping. I added dairy (which some people can do) but it didn’t help with the extra kilo or two that had crept back. I drank diet drinks, which isn’t advised, and once or twice I dipped into the remnants of the hot chocolate powder. I started drinking lite beer, because it’s just so damn boring to drink water at a bar, and when I found a months-old Lindt chocolate in my girlfriend’s car, I devoured it greedily before my brain had a chance to talk some sense into me. It was the day before Valentine’s Day, I rationalised, and tomorrow I’d be indulging. So that day was a write-off (I think I remember some chocolate powder too) and the next day there was dessert… and then K’s mom arrived for a 10-day holiday from Malaysia, so it was all about the pina coladas and French fries.

Things were not good.

They came to a head this past weekend, when I clocked four slabs of chocolate in a single day. K’s mom’s here, we’re eating out anyway, I’m just gonna go balls-to-the-wall and then get back on it when she leaves was how I made it okay. But my clothes aren’t fitting anymore, and this has NEVER happened to me before. I feel gross, and parts of me jiggle when I drive on bumpy roads. I HATE it.

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What I’d been struggling to understand was why this diet had worked so well the first time, and not when I tried to get back onto it in Jan. Obviously, it’s because the first time, there was NO cheating. Not a grain of sugar, not a drop of booze. The second time round, I got a bit more slack. Lots of dairy, the odd drink here and there – and of course a day or two of cheating every few weeks.

Not only was my body completely confused – high carb? high fat? what’s going on? – but I also wasn’t allowing it to overcome its sugar cravings. If you cut the stuff out completely, it sucks for a couple of days but you get over it. If you keep having tiny bits here and there, you never stop craving it. Basically, it’s like a drug – we all know that – but I needed to come to that realisation physically, if that makes sense.

“Maybe you just shouldn’t keep chocolate in the house.” – my sister. Very wise, she is.

I must point out that K is also on this diet, and she has lost 10kgs! She’s been amazing and so much more committed than I. Her willpower and reserve is just phenomenal, and pretty damn inspiring, given her own sugar cravings.

So what now?

Now I’m back on the wagon, albeit shakily, and doing my utmost to get this right. I loved how I felt when I was doing LCHF properly, and I loved the results. I especially loved not craving sugar. It’s hard at first but it’s an investment well worth making.

I’m not quite sure why I wanted to write this – I think that unlike many of my other posts, it was more for me than anything else. Perhaps to remind myself why I’m doing this and why it’s so worth it. And maybe, if you’ve also fallen off the wagon, it might help you too 🙂

Every time, it's a victory. Strive for these victories!

It’s a victory every time. Strive for these victories!

Pros and cons of a low carb high fat (LCHF) diet

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Tons of people are following a low carb, high fat (LCHF) lifestyle at the moment and raving about it – and I can see why. Having followed the diet myself for several weeks, I can tell you that I’m really happy on it – but, like every eating plan, it’s not for everyone. In my completely non-expert opinion, and in the spirit of experimentation, here are my top pros and cons.

 Pros

  • Quick initial weight loss. Within one week of starting the diet, I dropped 2kgs, with what felt like very little effort.
  • Never/seldom hungry. I’ve never lost weight this effectively without feeling ravenous all the time. I hardly ever feel hungry and I certainly don’t feel like I’m on diet.
  • You don’t eat ‘diet foods’. If you love meat, nuts, seeds, eggs and dairy, LCHF is perfect for you. No rice cakes or diet shakes or grapefruit.
  • It helps manage my IBD symptoms. It took a few weeks for my BMs to regulate, but from the start I had almost no digestive discomfort, and very little bloating. My belly seems to love LCHF.
  • No sugar cravings. Possibly one of the biggest benefits for me, a self-confessed sugar addict, is the fact that including more fat in my diet seems to have combatted my sugar cravings, and even reduced my taste for the stuff.
  • Feeling better. When I eat sugary and gluten-based foods, I often wake up the next day feeling groggy, ‘stuffy’ and just generally under the weather. Sometimes, if I really overindulge in these foods, I get terrible cramps and my body even feels sore to the touch. I always feel good and healthy when eating LCHF.
  • Easier food prep. Steak and salad is quicker and simpler to prepare than, say, a curry. Grabbing a handful of almonds is an easier snack than whipping up a smoothie. But this depends on what you like to cook and eat.

Cons

  • Expense. LCHF foods aren’t necessarily ‘cheap’ foods, especially now that this style of eating is so trendy. The price of meat, nuts and cheese all adds up – to a lot. You may find it balances out if you were previously buying lots of packaged or processed food, but then again, it might not.
  • Less butternut and banana. I had to cut out two of my staples, which made me sad. But pumpkin is fine, and once I combatted my sugar cravings (which only took a day or two), I didn’t miss bananas at all.
  • Limited choices. Particularly when it comes to snacking, it can be hard to find LCHF foods that aren’t pricy (nuts), unrealistic to eat on their own (a piece of meat or a block of cheese) or simply difficult to get on the run (have you ever tried to find a ready-to-eat, ripe avo at your local corner shop? Yup, exactly).
  • Very rich foods. High-fat foods can be very rich, and about three weeks into the diet, I became quite nauseated – a feeling that lasted a number of days. I’m not sure if it was too much fat or protein, or just being completely and utterly sick of eating eggs, but it wasn’t pleasant. Nothing really helped – I just had to wait for it to subside (which it did).
  • Lactose intolerance. If you’re lactose intolerant, like me, your options are even more limited. I have been including a bit of cheese in my diet as a test, and it seems mostly fine.
  • Snacking is HARD. I know I’ve covered this already, but it bears repeating. Every snack is supposed to include some fat and protein – this means that you shouldn’t really be snacking on fruit or yoghurt, especially if you’re trying to avoid fruit. I graze on biltong, nuts, grain-free toast and cheese, but again, these are not cheap snacks and they’re not easy to grab on the run.
  • Weight loss can plateau quickly. If you’re following the diet for weight-loss purposes, you might find your weight loss comes to an abrupt halt. This could be due to eating too much fat and protein – after all, it’s not a free-for-all. Nuts, butter, cream, etc are calorie bombs and even if they’re allowed on the diet, they’ll hinder your weight-loss efforts if you overindulge. Remember that it’s HIGH fat, MEDIUM protein and LOW carb.

So as you can see, there are benefits and drawbacks to LCHF eating – as there are to any other kind of diet. The only way to find out whether or not it’ll work for you is to try it. And if you have, please share your thoughts and experiences – I’d love to hear your feedback 🙂