Diet vs drugs: Why I’m sticking with my UC medication in 2015

tumblr_mj6p9ihnrb1r4nzfzo1_1280

So let me begin with a disclaimer: I’m not a doctor (yada yada); I’m not any sort of medical professional (blah blah blah) and I speak only from my own layperson experiences (etc etc).

Today I saw my doctor for the first time in a year! Time was when I saw him monthly, before I was diagnosed with UC, and soon after, while I struggled to get my last flare under control.

Am I in remission?

Hard to say, says the doc. And for that reason, he doesn’t want to take me off my meds. I’ve been taking Asacol (800mg) twice a day for almost a year and a half. I have been fortunate in that I haven’t experienced any side effects that I’ve been aware of, although I know this isn’t true for everyone.

Asacol is a very small, very simple part of my life. I take it every morning and most nights. I say ‘most’ nights, because sometimes I forget (and I’m totally okay anyway). But doc says that coming off it completely may send me back into a flare, and considering I’m doing so well, I’m so healthy, and I’m experiencing no side effects, there’s no reason to come off it.

Medication vs. diet: What a year has taught me

tumblr_mp9jvcQHKu1rp3o0qo1_1280

When I was first diagnosed with ulcerative colitis, I read loads and loads of blogs and forums and really anything the Google results returned. I found that many, many people were successfully treating their autoimmune diseases through diet, and I wanted in. I didn’t want to rely on medication, and so my healing diet journey began.

First up was SCD, and I believe it did great things for my body, flushing it of toxins and giving it a good long time to just recover. Essentially, I treated my gut like a baby’s, and that was exactly what it needed…

… but it wasn’t a permanent fix. Next up I tried autoimmune paleo for a while, and struggled with it (it was just too restrictive, so I kept cheating and bingeing, and then guilting myself and it was ALL TOO MUCH). Paleo was next, and that’s probably the diet I stick closest to now, although I’m certainly not strictly paleo.

I try to eat a high fat, mid protein, low carb diet. Basically, a healthy diet devoid of processed junk. I stick with it around 90% of the time, and I’m happy with that.

But that said.

I do not believe that diet alone could have helped me get my symptoms under control – because I tried; I did. I was terrified of going to the doctor when I was bleeding daily, severely – I didn’t want to know what was wrong with me, and anyway I was convinced it was cancer (aren’t we always? Thanks Dr Google). So I searched for holistic, natural cures for diarrhoea. I had a freezer crammed with blueberries, a fridge full of fresh ginger and cupboards creaking under the weight of white rice and salted crackers. I tried doing a completely ‘white’ diet – rice, bread, pasta, etc – and that helped for a while, until it didn’t any more. I tried avoiding fibre, but I was way too far gone for that. Then for a while, I lived on boiled eggs and basmati rice because it was all my tummy could handle.

None of it stopped the diarrhoea, at least for any significant period of time – and that of course is because I was in the midst of an aggressive flare, and I needed cortisone, and then long-term medication to manage it.

Asacol has changed my life. Throughout all my dietary experimentation of 2014 – and there was a lot of it – Asacol staved off flares and helped keep my system in check, even when I had cramps and discomfort and the occasional bout of OMG-it’s-another-flare panic.

I’m not saying that a dietary change can’t help some people – we’ve all seen piles and piles of evidence stating the opposite. But diet alone wasn’t the answer for me; medication has been.

Of course, that doesn’t mean I abuse my body. I don’t fill it with unhealthy rubbish just because Asacol is so good at keeping the junk from causing trouble. I try to stick to my healthy, clean eating as much as possible, and I won’t go back to grains, or too much dairy, because it places strain on my body that it simply does not need. I want to know, one day when I’m old, that I did everything I could to promote good health long into old age. As anyone with IBD knows, it can lead to many other horrible complications later in life.

For me, the answer so far has been meds first, diet second, but always focusing on eating healthily. I know this flies in the face of what many bloggers say, and as I reiterate, it’s simply my own experience.

If you’re flaring, if you’re very sick and you can’t get your symptoms under control, see a doctor. And if what you’re doing is working for you, that’s simply great.

Interesting note about dairy

Ba

   Basically exactly how it feels  

I’ve discovered fairly recently that I’m able to tolerate small to ‘mid’-sized amounts of dairy, despite being lactose intolerant.

There is a belief that if you’re intolerant to a certain type of food, and you cut it out completely for some time, your body begins to ‘recover’ and may be able to handle it in small quantities again. This has been my experience (this in particular I think is more due to diet than medication, but obviously the meds must help). I cut dairy out for about a year, so I think that gave my body some much-needed recovery time. But I don’t push it – after all, I’m still lactose intolerant, and overdoing it could be a contributing factor to flares, so I (mostly) take it nice and slow with foods that are very low in lactose.

Here’s to another flare-free year.

Advertisements