7 Days of gut-healing meals (and why they’re good for you)

Lately I’ve redoubled my efforts to include as many healing, happy-gut foods in my diet. Here are some of my current favourite meals and snacks for health and healing.

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Chopped banana, strawberries and frozen blueberries drizzled with honey

It’s sad that fruit has a bad reputation (mainly due to its high fructose content), because it can really be so healthy. Bananas are easy to digest and they give you energy and heart-supporting potassium. I’ve also always found them extremely soothing to eat, especially when my tummy’s unhappy. Strawberries give me a good dose of vitamin C and blueberries are known to help ease the symptoms of digestive diseases.

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Eggs, baby spinach and music

A lot of healing diets forbid or discourage the consumption of eggs, but I’ve never personally had a problem with them. They’re full of protein as well as important vitamins and minerals. Spinach meanwhile is virtually a ‘superfood’ and I’ve really been trying to get it into my diet as often as possible. I actually feel like I’m slowly healing my body with each mouthful! Spinach is full of vitamins, and it’s even got Omega-3 fatty acids and anti-inflammatory antioxidants. It’s good for digestion and flushing out toxins, and I recently learnt that cooking spinach actually increases its health benefits because the body can’t completely break down its nutrients when it’s raw. Music is good for the mind, body and soul, so include as much of it in your diet as you can.

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Brussels sprouts

I adore Brussels sprouts (I know, it’s unusual!) and I can easily – and often do – eat bowls of them as snacks. Like most other veggies, they offer high doses of vitamins and nutrients, as well as their fair share of fibre. This means they can cause bloating and should be avoided if you’re flaring. Don’t cook your Brussels sprouts for too long or you’ll destroy the healthy bits! Three to five minutes is enough.

 

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ALL THE VEGETABLES!!! (and a little steak)

So this is what my dinner plate looks like most nights. I take the 3/4 veggie rule so seriously that I usually end up with four quarters of vegetables on my plate and no space for the meat – hence the mashed butternut on the side! Starting with the butternut, it’s filling and easy to digest – it’s one of the first vegetables you can introduce on SCD, and I’ve always loved it and found it to be unproblematic. Carrots are the first veggie introduced on SCD, as they’re also generally very easy to break down. They’re also full of vitamins and minerals.

Broccoli and cauliflower are cruciferous vegetables (as are Brussels sprouts, bok choy, cabbage and kale), which means they’re packed with phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals and fibre, and overall they’re just amazingly fabulous for your health. They also help support the functioning of the digestive tract (read this fascinating article about the healthy interaction between cruciferous vegetables and the bacteria in your gut). Most of us know that peas are a great source of protein and fibre – but did you know that they also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties?

Avocado is one of the healthiest fats you can add to your diet and its Omega-3 helps to reduce inflammation in the gut. My nutritionalist has recommended I eat it every day – that’s how healing it is! Lastly, lean red meat is obviously a protein source, and despite what detractors might say, it’s also one of the best sources of nutrients that you won’t get from plant-based foods.

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Coconut fish curry with cauliflower rice

I’m not the biggest fish fan but I am trying to get it into my diet more often because it’s just so damn healthy. This is hake, which offers Omega-3 acids and a range of nutrients. I’ve cooked it in homemade coconut milk, which is another incredibly healthy fat that my nutritionalist recommends I consume daily, due to the fact that it’s so healing for the gut. As you can see, I’ve tossed in some handfuls of baby spinach for an extra health kick, and it’s seasoned with all the usual ‘legal’ seasonings like garlic and ginger – both of which are also considered ‘super foods’ due to their healing and health-sustaining properties.

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Coconut yoghurt with honey

This is made from coconut milk, and has the added benefit of gelatine and probiotics, which are added just prior to incubating it. Probiotics introduce healthy bacteria to your gut and gelatine is an amazing weapon in the fight against inflammation.  This is one of the healthiest things you can feed a damaged gut. Here’s my recipe for homemade coconut yogurt.

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Oysters and champagne

Okay so this was a bit of a splurge (I was celebrating signing my permanent contract at work), and champagne – or any alcohol for that matter – should be avoided when you’re flaring, or when you’re trying to heal your gut. I was thrilled to discover some time ago that oysters, however, are so so good for you! They’re full of zinc, which is essential for those of us battling digestive diseases as we tend to lose a lot of it. Zinc is essential for healthy functioning and also helps to heal woulds. You’ll find it in pumpkin seeds too.

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Bonus: Cauliflower pizza

Everyone needs to feel like they’re eating something fun every now and then – even those of us with IBD! This cauliflower pizza was made from many of the healthy ingredients listed above, so it has the added benefit of hitting that ‘junk food’ spot without actually being junk food! The olives and mushrooms are also sources of healthy fats and nutrients, and it’s all drizzled with coconut oil for that extra bit of healing.

What are you favourite healing, healthy meals?

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Paleo pizza on grain-free seed toast – vegan/vegetarian

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I’ve made cauliflower pizza crusts a few times and while I find them very tasty, it’s a pretty labour intensive process. Also, my bases never really mimic the texture of a ‘real’ pizza base (well mine don’t, anyway). So on Friday when I was craving a pizza – the kind you can pick up in your hands without it disintegrating – I knew cauliflower wasn’t going to be the answer. Instead, I decided to use grain free seed toast as my base.

The result was delicious, filling and as close to pizza as I’ve come so far. Plus it was incredibly easy to make. You can obviously change the toppings to suit your taste – these are just my faves.

Paleo pizza on grain-free seed toast

Ingredients

  • 3 slices grain free toast (I buy Lifebake)
  • A few teaspoons tomato paste
  • Dried basil and oreganum
  • Chopped garlic
  • 1 large tomato, sliced
  • 1/4 onion, sliced thinly
  • Handful of calamata olives, pitted and halved
  • Half a ripe avocado, sliced
  • Salt and black pepper

Method

Preheat oven to 180C (350F).

In a small bowl, mix the tomato paste, oreganum and basil. Spread the mixture onto your slices of grain toast.

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Cover the toast with all the toppings except the avo. Bake for 10 minutes.

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Remove from the oven and top with slices of avocado. Season with salt and pepper.

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Voila! And you’ll be able to pick it up in your hands – WIN!

Day 100!! Celebrating with phase 5 and pizza – cauliflower pizza that is

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100 days! I’ve reached my goal!

Today has been a whole day of celebrating this milestone, the SCD-legal way! It started with two big bowls of biltong for brunch – it’s one of my favourite delicacies but I haven’t been able to eat it on SCD, because a) it’s raw and only allowed on phase 5, and b) it’s usually covered with spices that I hadn’t introduced before now.

The butchery downstairs sells amazing biltong so I spent a small fortune there and gleefully skipped home with my bounty. Biltong is a little like jerky except much, much better and way more delicious. It’s raw, highly spiced and salted meat that is left to dry. It’s K’s absolute fave, and since she was leaving for Kuala Lampur today, I wanted to include her in my 100 day celebrations before she left – which meant I incidentally started phase 5 too.

Mmm, biltong

Mmm, biltong

Next up, I attempted to make some Larabars, which actually just turned into bliss balls without the coconut. I used cashews, dates, vanilla extract and spices, but I’m taking great care with them because of my previous bad reactions to nuts.

Finally, after dropping K off at the airport, I came home and made myself some cauliflower pizzas for supper.

The base was made of riced cauliflower (one head, steamed), mixed with 2 whole eggs and a heaped tablespoon of coconut flour. Next time, I’ll use the egg whites only, as the base tasted quite eggy. Also, it didn’t firm up brilliantly – it remained quite soggy even after 15 minutes at about 180 degrees C. I think the cauliflower – as well as the toppings – were too wet.

I topped the bases with tomato paste, dried basil, oreganum and Italian spices, and then a whole whack of fresh veggies: fresh tomato, olives, onion, garlic, coriander (cilantro) and spinach mixed with home-made tomato sauce. I baked it for a further 10 minutes, then topped it with avo slices. It tasted delicious but it was very, very soggy! Any tips for making a crispy cauliflower base without cheese?

For dessert, as always, it was a fresh batch of SCD yogurt (recipe here) drenched in honey. Life is good and my belly is HAPPY!

I’ll keep posting and over the next few days I’ll share my thoughts on 100 days on SCD.

How’s your diet going?

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